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COVID 19: MY ORAL HEALTH

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W ith recent emergence of novel virus COVID -19 pandemic, many dental offices across the country are closed down while some are already postponing non emergency dental treatment. Hence, it's more important to keep good oral health home care. HOME CARE FOR GOOD ORAL HEALTH Always wash your hands before and after any personal dental care. Brush twice daily with flouride containing toothpaste and medium textured tooth brush. Brush your tongue regularly. Check here Floss a day Eat a well - balanced diet for oral and general health well being. Include detergent food in your diet for cleansing and health oral cavity. Limit frequency of snacking Limit sugary drinks like soda and fruit juices which can be harmful to teeth surfaces. Drink plenty of water Avoid smoking Use of Mouth guard for contact sport

World Cancer Day;- Facts about Human papilloma Virus(HPV)




While Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is most notable for its involvement in cervical cancer, it should also be understood that HPV is commonly found in the oral cavity as well. Several studies have demonstrated a connection between HPV and oral cancer, which has tremendous relevance in patient care, including treatment and prevention of disease.

Human Papilloma Virus ( HPV ) Facts:

  • HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus and infection in the US.
  • There are nearly 200 different strains of HPV, most of which are harmless and do not cancer. Out of all these, 9 are known to cause cancers, and another 6 are suspected of causing cancers as they are commonly found along with one of the nine we know to be oncogenic. In oral cancers, we are primarily concerned with HPV number 16 which is also associated with cervical, anal, and penile cancers besides those of the oropharynx.
  • One can have HPV without ever knowing it because the virus often produces no signs or symptoms that you will notice, and the immune response to clear it is not a process that you will be aware of.
  • If one test positive for HPV, there is no sure way to know when you were infected with HPV, or who gave it to you. Someone can have HPV for many years, even decades, before it is detected or it develops into something serious like a cancer. In the vast majority of infected people, even with a high-risk version of HPV known to cause cancers, they will not develop cancer.
  • Testing positive for an HPV infection does not mean that you or your partner is having sex outside of your relationship. It is believed to have long periods of inactivity or dormancy that may even cover decades; these are periods of time that you will test negative for it.
  • Sexual partners who have been together for a while tend to share all types of sexual infections. Typically if one partner has a fungal infection like Candida, the other partner has it as well, even though they may appear to be asymptomatic. The same is true of other common sexual infections like Chlamydia, a bacterial infection. HPV viral infections also are commonly shared. This means that the partner of someone who tests positive for HPV likely has HPV already, even though they may have no signs or symptoms. Like most Americans, their immune system will customarily clear it in under 2 years.
  • Condoms may lower your chances of contracting or passing the virus to your sexual partners if used all the time and the right way. However, HPV can infect areas that are not covered by a condom- so condoms may not fully protect against HPV.

Don’t hesitate to contact me for further clarification, Dr. Odeyemi Kolade Project Smile 32 Senior facilitator 0806-9815-500

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